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1.17 1985 Uluru handback

<p>Commemorative poster presented to Governor-General Sir Ninian Stephen on the occasion of the handing back of Ulu<u>r</u>u to its traditional owners in 1985.&nbsp;Artist: Chips Mackinolty</p>

National Museum of Australia

<p>Commemorative poster presented to Governor-General Sir Ninian Stephen on the occasion of the handing back of Ulu<u>r</u>u to its traditional owners in 1985.&nbsp;Artist: Chips Mackinolty</p>

It is 1985.

The area, known to many non-Indigenous people as Ayers Rock National Park, is known to the traditional owners, the Anangu, as Uluru.

The traditional owners control the area surrounding Uluru under Land Rights legislation, but that does not include the rock itself.

How could European and Anangu claims to the area be reconciled?

Read the information in the Defining Moment in Australian history: 1985 Australian government returns Uluru to its traditional owners and answer the questions that follow.

1. Why is the area known by two names?

2. How did the granting of Aboriginal land rights in the 1970s impact the Uluru area?

3. How were problems overcome?

4. What was the significance of the Uluru handback for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rights?

5. How would this event have influenced the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rights over time?

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