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1.27 2008 National Apology to the Stolen Generations

<p>Invitation to former Link-Up (NSW) caseworker Wendy Hermeston from Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, to attend the national apology to the Stolen Generations</p>

National Museum of Australia

<p>Invitation to former Link-Up (NSW) caseworker Wendy Hermeston from Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, to attend the national apology to the Stolen Generations</p>

It is 2008.

The 1997 Bringing Them Home report has revealed stories of loss, harm and abuse of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who were forcibly removed from their families and placed into institutions for their care.

There is pressure for the Australian Parliament to apologise for the harm done.

Read the information in the Defining Moment in Australian history: 2008 National Apology to the Stolen Generations and answer the questions that follow.

1. Who are the ‘Stolen Generations’?

2. What government policies contributed to their situation?

3. What impacts did these policies have on Aboriginal children and families?

4. Why did the Australian Government make an official apology?

5. Why do you think a government would apologise for policies that it did not itself introduce?

6. What was the significance of the National Apology to the Stolen Generations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rights?

7. How would this event have influenced the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s rights over time?

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